Posts Tagged ‘science’

The dreaded ‘Write Up’ stage approaches

Only a few months remain before I leave the lab and enter the dreaded ‘write up’ stage of my PhD, where I hear day and night no longer hold such distinction, and it becomes acceptable to drink before noon. Duvet day, everyday! I fear that novelty may wear off pretty darn quick.

To be honest, my project has been on a steady track to doom since the start, but a couple of months ago began to turn around. I can just see a glimmer of light at the end of the tunnel, partly because I might not have 80,000 words of pure negativity, and partly because this last year is finally coming to an end.

The final year is a strange one, as I’ve been told by many a friend that made it to the end. I want to be rid of this year just as much as I want to cling onto it with both hands. I want to leave this year behind mostly because of the stress. Oh, the stress! Frantically trying to finish experiments that are really resisting completion, whilst having to accept that not everything will actually be done by the time October comes around, and that any promising aspects of my project might be picked up by another student in the future. I feel very territorial about my work, which is why I don’t want to ever leave – I want to stay and finish every last bit myself. Alas, I have to fly the nest because nothing is ever finished in academia.
I must admit, the light emerging ahead of me evokes a level of excitement inside. The nervous kind of excitement that comes from wanting to move on into the big wide world and it being almost close enough to touch, but also not knowing what on earth that will bring. I could be unemployed for months, or I could be snapped up into the job of my dreams. Who knows? But, I’ve been traveling through this dark tunnel of a PhD for so long now, the brightness and vastness of the world ahead is also frightening one. How will the harsh environment outside of my little academia bubble feel?

My next post may well be written from a duvet den at around 3am, laptop on knee and gin in hand. But thankfully (I think), it’s now back to the lab.

Perks of being a tree-hugger!

Sustainability of the environment is not a subject that should be taken lightly. The relationship between man and his environment is rocketing towards a non-existence. We should want to preserve our environment as it is crucial for the existence of the earth, every living being and for future generations. By the time I have finished writing this post, I’m sure my propaganda will have swayed itself into your subconscious and you’ll wake up tomorrow morning wanting to become a tree-hugger.
The way the environmental science course is taught here at QMUL Geography relates immensely to what is occurring at this present time in the outside world. We are purposely taught to start reading scientific journals, articles etc, instead of out-dated text books. This was something that will get us in the habit of reading current event materials. The field trip to the mountains of Scotland I went on in my first year at Easter was the stuff of dreams – putting theory into practice has really helped consolidate my learning.

The following are pictures taken by myself from Scotland, in the Cairngorms field trip (first year) 2014.

Honestly speaking, this course wasn’t something I had always envisioned myself studying. It was something that came to me in my final year at college when I was in the process of applying to universities.  I wasn’t lucky enough to be one of those people who always knew what they wanted to be. And there are thousands of people who don’t know just like myself, so it takes a bit of experimenting to discover what interests you. After my departure from Scotland and by the end of my first academic year I have truly felt even more excited and am 100% content with my course.
I would love to voice my thoughts to the many people who doubt our ability to resolve and restore order within our environment.  It is natural habitats such as these with gorgeous scenery and therapeutic landscapes that bring us down to earth and makes us truly question the impact we have on our planet and inspires us to preserve it to the best of our ability.
©2019 QMUL Student Blogs