Posts Tagged ‘Medicine’

It’s OK to not be having fun

“It’s such a doss year!”

“Freshers is so epic!”

“Everyone is so nice!”

These are just some of the phrases I heard both before, and during my first year in medical school.

With freshers’ week fast approaching, I imagine prospective students are starting to feel the fear and excitement that comes with opening a new chapter in one’s life. It’s no wonder; the first year of university is often portrayed as the most instructive and adventurous time in our studies, even in our lives….perhaps that’s why it was so easy for me to feel alone in my unhappiness during this period. Between moving away from home, being dunked head-first into a flurry of confusing lectures, and navigating the foreign social landscape, I felt as if I were caught in the eye of a storm: directionless, isolated and hopeless. It’s hard to know who to listen to during freshers- the second-year who tells you it’s OK to miss lectures? Your friend who says you should start revising a month early? Your specialist lecturers who insist their teaching will be imperative for your future career? How did everyone else have it so together?

This is not meant to put prospective students off. In fact, that time of struggle taught me a lot about being a “grown-up”:

  • Never set your standards (professional and personal) by the apparent certainty of someone else.
  • Never think that the people around you aren’t as scared as you are.
  • Never think that bad times will last.
  • At some point, someone will gossip about you. Move past it and so will everyone else.
  • Friendships happen.

I hope that by writing this, or through my interactions with scared-looking freshers, that I’ve helped pay some of these lessons forward. As for me, the lesson I’ve learned is to always be helpful and gentle to the people around you…especially freshers going through the torture of FunMed!

UCAS Adjustment – Changing your plans at the last minute

I had an offer to study at another university, but after doing better than I expected in my exams, I changed my mind and decided to join QMUL through Adjustment.

 

Choosing to study at Queen Mary

I had in mind that I wanted to follow a medicine-related career. Queen Mary University of London has a very good reputation in this field, ranking 2nd in the UK for medicine, so I knew that studying at this university would best prepare me for my future career. The Mile End campus, where the majority of teaching takes place, has great facilities, is very beautiful and green, and is located alongside the Regent’s Canal and the Mile End Park. Also, QMUL is located in central London, which makes it very convenient to explore London.

 

The Adjustment process

I found out about Adjustment through my Diploma coordinator back in Greece after I received my IB results in July, which exceeded my offer’s requirements. I feel fortunate and thankful that my school was so helpful and did everything humanly possible to support my Adjustment application. After discussing my options, I researched various universities on UCAS and on their websites. After selecting a couple of universities, I started contacting them via phone or email. QMUL was the first university to offer me a place on their Biomedical Sciences course. After getting a provisional acceptance, I had to wait until A-level results day (mid August) to apply via UCAS Adjustment. It took only a few days to receive my QMUL final acceptance.

 

Changing plans at the last minute

Changing plans at the last minute is never easy and always stressful. Take a step back so that you can clearly see your options and the benefits and drawbacks that come with each. It is very important to use every single available resource (eg teachers, university counsellors, university websites, etc). Trust your gut feeling, believe that you are on the right track and everything will be alright!

 

Moving to a different country

Moving to London from Greece was a huge step in my life. The first months were a culture shock, but eventually I became part of London. Making friends was initially one of my biggest concerns, but when I came to London, and especially to QMUL, I realised how easy it was to find great friends from all around the world.

 

Living in London

The best thing about living in London is that you can never get bored. There are so many things to do and so many places to explore that make London a very unique place to live. After living in London for nine months, I can honestly say that I have seen only a small part of London’s beauty and culture. It feels like I’m living the dream, but it has not fully sunken in yet.

 

Making the most of student life

London is full of extra-curricular opportunities for students. I am a volunteer with St. John Ambulance, something that I discovered through QMUL’s LINKS society. I am currently planning to undertake a summer placement in one of London’s biggest hospitals. Being a competitive swimmer for many years before coming to QMUL, I now also enjoy staying fit and going to the gym regularly.

 

The best thing about studying at QMUL

The best thing about studying at QMUL has been the people I have met and the friendships I have developed which made the whole journey enjoyable and exciting.

 

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First time visiting QMUL (29th July 2016)

 

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Last lecture of 2016 (16th December 2016)

Smile! Geographer on camera to help BBC get behind drills, dentures and dentistry

Kristin Hussey Headshot

PhD student in the School of Geography Kristin Hussey

Most people tend to think of academics and postgraduate students as always buried in books in some dusty archive or whiling away behind a computer screen. I think you would be surprised at all of the different research activities we actually get up to. Not to say we don’t do those things; as a historical geographer, books, archives and museums are the reality of my day to day. But now more than ever it’s important to reach out and engage audiences with our research in new ways. Sometimes, this can mean actually getting in front of a camera and discussing your interests with a broadcast audience!

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Kristin talks about her previous research into dental surgery during WWI with prize-winning writer, historian and author of the BBC’s Eyewitness audiobooks, presenter Professor Joanna Bourke.

In the past I’d assumed you needed to be a lecturer before your opinion was sought out for on-camera interviews, but actually there seems to be a growing interest in history and historical research. I know I personally tune in to all sorts of shows along the lines of ‘Secret Killers of the Victorian Home’ to hear historians give me all the gruesome details. I’d never thought as a PhD student I’d have the opportunity to be on camera, so when I was asked to be interviewed by Professor Joanna Bourke for her one-hour special ‘Drills, Dentures and Dentistry: An Oral History’, I didn’t know where to begin!

In the show I’m actually discussing research I carried out in my previous position as Assistant Curator of the Hunterian Museum on dental surgery in the First World War. While my time period of interest has remained roughly the same, I’m now studying in the School of Geography at Queen Mary University of London to examine the influence of the empire and the development of British medicine in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Fortunately my supervisors have been very supportive of my continuing with any talks or appearances I’m offered on the subject of my previous work. It’s important to remember that your PhD is just one project in your broader career!

With no media experience at all, QMUL was absolutely fantastic at giving me some pointers on what to do on the day. Everything from how to dress to pattern of speaking can be very important. What I don’t think anyone prepared me for was how very hard filming can be. Hours upon hours under the hot lights becomes exhausting – especially when you don’t have a script and so you need to try and come up with an answer on the spot with the camera rolling! It doesn’t really matter how well you know your topic that can be tricky. Also, in order to get the interview from a variety of shots, you need to repeat yourself many times. I’m sure I gave wildly different answers in each take, so that’s definitely something to work on for the future. I was incredibly impressed by Joanna Bourke’s calm and professionalism doing this exhausting work.

Overall it was an interesting experience and I hope I’ll have another opportunity to give TV history a go as my PhD research progresses!

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The BBC programme was filmed at the Royal College of Surgeons here in London.

If you’d like to read more about my research, click through to my profile page on the School of Geography website.

Watch now on BBC iPlayer (Kristin at 44.30) or read more about BBC 4’s Drills, Dentures and Dentustry: An Oral History. It aired on BBC 4 on March 30th at 9pm, 2015.

From Medicine to Medical Engineering

Tissue Engineering

I study Medical Engineering at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL), but that’s not how I began my university career. Originally I was accepted into the university to study medicine.

Like almost every medical school applicant, I had spent most of my secondary school years knowing that I wanted to be a doctor. For me, it was a love for science and problem solving as well as a desire to help people that sparked my interest in the subject. As a result, my GCSE and A level choices (biology, chemistry, physics and maths) had all been guided towards a career in medicine. I had read the Lancet and New Scientist prior to applying, and had tried to learn as much as I could about new advancements in medical technology and patient care. Medical technology was something that particularly interested me, and which I spoke about a lot at interview.

When I started medical school I found it very interesting, and enjoyed the mixture of lecture based, problem solving and practical clinical skills teaching. However, one of the aspects of medicine that interested me the most seemed to be completely absent from the course! I felt that there was not any real emphasis on the research and development side of the field.

As the year progressed, I began to think that maybe a career in medical research or technology would be a better choice for me. I looked at other medical related courses available at the university and came across Medical Engineering – a subject I had never previously heard of – which seemed to offer everything I felt was missing from my medical course.

After speaking to some of the lecturers and tutors, and finding out more about the course. I moved to the School of Engineering and Material Science (SEMS) at the end of my first year and began studying Medical Engineering.

The mixture of modules taught are very varied, with some based in pure engineering (such as Dynamic Systems in Engineering), and others with a focus more on how engineering can be related to anatomy and biological functions (e.g. Fluid Dynamics of the Cardiovascular System). QMUL is a great place to study the subject, with research being carried out in a number of key and exciting areas, like tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and orthopaedic implant design.

As well as the course being great, SEMS has provided a lot of other support. With regular tutor meetings and the Peer Assisted Study Support (PASS) mentoring scheme, I felt completely at home when I began the course. Additionally the school provides assistance to students in finding work experience and placements. I undertook a month long internship in Singapore last summer and am currently working in London on a 1 year industrial placement, both of which were advertised by SEMS. These opportunities have not only been interesting and fun, but will improve my employability in the future.

I can honestly say that choosing to study Medical Engineering here at QMUL has been the best decision I have ever made. Not only have I found the course content fascinating, but I have had the opportunity to see world class research, met some brilliant people, and been able to get involved in an exciting and rapidly developing field.

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