Work Experience

Countdown 2030, SDGs Conference

In winter of 2015, UCL institution for ‘Global Poverty’ was holding a conference – one academic conference at the UCL institution and a pop-up workshop with installations in Stratford, East London. The conference brought together award-winning young entrepreneurs and the millennial generation on the roadmap to 2030 when the United Nations (UN) will strive to eradicate poverty worldwide by achieving the 17 set goals. As I was at the academic conference, with fellow UpRisers and UpRising Alumni (in partnership with Queen Mary University of London) we volunteered to act as correspondence by tweeting on all things based on the 20 years to prosperity and Sustainable Development Goals. It was a day packed with cakes, Twitter and fun and entailed a very informative and interesting agenda with key issues that were being discussed.

The team! At the end of a successful day full of tweeting all Sustainable Goals related topics

The team! At the end of a successful day full of tweeting all Sustainable Goals related topics

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Q&A at the end of the second half of the conference! Many points were raised about ‘How many aspirations are based on what people want the world to look like rather than personal objectives and goals’ Data shows millennial are not as selfish and narcissistic as people may think, as young people aged between 18-30 years are the new game changers, we are the millennium generation!

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Some interesting issues were raised about the link between poor education and health. Studies show that there is a link between people who have poor school performance and poor health in later life, this makes sense, right!. Poor education leads to the likelihood of dropping out of school, becoming unemployed and thus receiving welfare. Therefore, the prospects of attaining a job or building a career are non-existent. Consequently leading to low self-confidence, self-worth and inevitably depression. The adverse effects of not investing in good quality education – stay in school kids!

QConsult, Supported by [J.P.Morgan]

Queen Mary University Partnered with J.P.Morgan to offer students an opportunity to work as consultants on mini-consultancy projects in East London. I applied for QConsult, Supported by J.P.Morgan in summer 2016 and was fortunate to be accepted into the program. I had the privilege to work with the Wellcome Trust, a global charitable foundation who supports scientists and researchers to answer scientific questions in the area of medical science and public health. The funding that the institution receives benefits over 14,000 people in over 70 countries and thus has major development impacts to the world.

The aim of the program was to support the Wellcome Trust overcome their challenges while increasing our employability by gaining new skills. Our objective as a team of 5 was to raise Wellcome Trusts profile as a graduate scheme amongst new graduates so that the institution employes people from a mixture of backgrounds in terms of their education, ethnicity and social status. Therefore, the scope of our work consisted of researching and analysing information on the Wellcome Trusts website design, entry requirements, application and assessment, salary, career progression, reputation and location. Through analysing this information we compared it to other organisations with reputable graduate schemes such as Deloitte, Accenture and Atkins in hopes to find a way to incorporate features which improve and increase the Wellcome Trusts appeal. Whilst conducting our project, my team and I received advice, professional guidance and training from the University Careers and Enterprise team which we adopted throughout our experience as consultants.

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This experience most definitely increased my confidence as I had always felt like I was never good enough or equal to others due to my background, however, being accepted into the program and given the opportunity to partake in the various activities of group work, attending meetings, working with the client at Wellcome Trust and giving presentations all added to my confidence. As a student, I was only ever exposed to classroom settings and so having the experience to work in a professional environment prepared me to work amongst professionals throughout in the workplace.

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Once I completed the programme, the Careers and Enterprise team got my group and me together in order to review the skills that we had gained from this experience in hopes to teach us how to communicate them effectively on our C.Vs and in an interview – I personally, I capitalised on my team working, communication, research and presentation skills. As a third-year student in Environmental Science, I had been thinking about my career prospects and I was considering becoming an Environmental Consultant. Therefore, taking part in this program allowed me to see what consultancy actually entails and whether it was something I truly want to pursue. I would definitely encourage students to apply for the programme and visit the Careers and Enterprise team as they truly help and guide you towards your next step in either further studies and/or career search.

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Delving Deeper Into Yourself

I reckon most of us have probably heard of the Myers-Briggs Indicator Type test. Well if you haven’t, you can check your ‘personality’ at https://www.16personalities.com/free-personality-test. According to this test, I am an ENFJ-T. However, I won’t elaborate too much about this –  there’s something else interesting about your personality.

 

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Do you know that every individual also has a risk personality? Psychological Consultancy Ltd created an assessment to evaluate one’s risk personality. These personalities are shown in the Risk Type Compass® below.

 

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Unfortunately, we would be unable to take the assessment as these are mainly created for businesses. This assessment has particular relevance to the banking and finance, insurance, energy, manufacturing and consulting sectors. Why do I have to say all these? Because as maths students, many of us are attracted to those industries.

 

Especially in the sectors mentioned above, an effective management of risk within the industry is vital to its growth. A study done by researchers over a 19-year period on over 1000 senior bankers from more than 150 were carried out. The study measures the riskiness of strategies of these bankers. It found that personalities were the integral factor in risk-taking.

 

Most organisational failures are typically caused by taking too much risk or taking insufficient risk, e.g. a group of predominantly risk-takers tend to amplify risk-taking, and a group with a great number of risk-averse members are less likely to take them. Hence, we need a more diverse range of personalities to balance this out to achieve an effective risk management! Of course, there are other factors that would make this work, such as establishing working relationships and concise communication with your colleagues in the firm. Other than winter, a number of us are in the season of applying for internships. Perhaps, if you are confident of your risk type or personality, could this probably be a point to mention to employers? (ehem, maybe.)

 

It is good for us to know ourselves deeper. Not just our risk personalities, but who we really are. More fully understanding yourself is a catalyst to personal growth – in studies, applying for jobs, decision-making and many more. Most significantly, always be genuine to yourself – no one is better than you at being you!

 

 

Getting Used To Readjusting and Experiencing More to Life

I used to sit at the back row in lectures sipping on my long black from Ground Café, while I listen to the lecturer explain. I’d nod in agreement and understanding of the material, and write down vital key points. I usually hit the gym or get extra sleep after lectures like these.

Keywords: USED TO.

Second year is tough as you have to readjust some things again. I’d come early to be able to save my friends and I some seats closer to the front. That implies waking up earlier as I no longer stay in the convenient halls on campus. I still tend to daydream in classes of my summer back home in Indonesia with good friends – and although it sounds really depressing how the start of this year goes, it actually isn’t.

Keyword: READJUST.

I find that the materials in second year are mostly based on your first year. Without a strong fundamental knowledge in first year, this year will feel difficult. However, as I am studying Mathematics with Actuarial Science, I feel that the modules made compulsory for me included the technical skills and knowledge that I need to becoming an actuary, for instance, “actuarial mathematics”. It has been very busy this year, considering internship online applications were mostly opened at the same time as term started. So I definitely recommend making a timetable for yourself so that you can balance and have time for other things as well, may they be work or leisure.

For the first years reading this, I recommend you to get work experience that would be relevant to your CV for second year internships.

For the second years reading this, join me in applying for internships. I’ve been rejected by a few but I’m still going. Hold on tight and keep going – we’ll get there.

Now, I drink my coffee quicker and take my notes faster than my cognition. I put on my earphones and launch Spotify while I revise in the library during hours between lectures or tutorials. I come home and after getting dinner, I continue either my revision, coursework, or online applications. This repeats until the weekend wakes me up like the morning light that shines on my face as it slid through the gaps in the blinds. Trust me though, despite the stress, challenges, and difficulties, it’s all part of that missing word, that in real life has the potential to make you grow and learn over time.

Keyword: EXPERIENCE.

Summer Internship

“So what are you planning to do after you graduate?” Ah, the dreaded question that makes undergraduates break into a cold sweat. There are many people who come to university knowing exactly what career field they want to pursue afterwards, however, there are also people who have no idea. If you do know, then great, good for you! However, if you belong to the latter category, fear not, because trust me when I say this, you don’t need to have your dream career figured out by your early 20s. In today’s world, the average person changes jobs around 12 times. Chances are that you will not spend all of your life at the same job and your dream career will constantly change. For me, that is an exciting prospect because it means that you would develop your career organically – continuously learning different skills from various working environments and applying them wherever you go.

It is nearly impossible to know if a job is perfect for you unless you get a feel of that particular field, and I think your time at university is the perfect opportunity to experiment with different job sectors. The summer holidays are incredibly long (too long!), so I would suggest you use some of this time to gain as much experience as possible. At Queen Mary, we have a fantastic Careers and Enterprise Centre, through which you can find part-time jobs, work experience and internships. This summer I took part in QProjects, which is an internship scheme that is organised by the Careers team every year. QProjects places QM students as Project Leaders on challenging projects within local charities.

I did my internship with the East End Community Foundation (EECF). EECF is a philanthropy advisor and grant maker. This means they fund grass-root organisations, issuing nearly £1 million annually to charities in Hackney, Tower Hamlets and Newham. My job was to help EECF with their Vital Signs 2017 Report. A Vital Sign Report uses a combination of existing research and surveys with local residents to identify key issues affecting local communities across the UK. I collated data from the surveys, and then analysed the data to find trends and patterns. I also worked as a researcher to find out more about the problems that affect the East End of London. My internship was originally meant to be for six weeks but EECF invited me to stay with them longer to work on their social media strategy. Here, I got to write case studies to promote the brilliant job that EECF has been doing, as well as working on their Facebook, Twitter and their website to raise their profile.

The EECF team at Sky Gardens

The EECF team at Sky Gardens

I had the best time working there! This was my first proper office-based job, and I got so much out of it: I honed my research and evaluation skills, got to go and network at a business breakfast at the Sky Gardens in Canary Wharf, learned about collaborating in a team and working within deadlines. I also got a full experience of a professional working life: I attended meetings with CEOs, contributed to strategy meetings within my department, and enjoyed being treated to staff lunches after big events.

My colleagues were incredibly supportive and welcoming, and to be honest, they have set my expectations for future employers impeccably high. I got to have 1-2-1 meetings with each member of staff and learn about their roles, which provided me with an invaluable insight into the charity sector. In terms of making the most out of your internship, my advice would be to be enthusiastic and to really take a keen interest in the work that you company is involved in. For example, I wanted to find out more about the charities that EECF supported so they generously arranged for me to go and visit some of the projects.

This was my desk at work. Check out my QM water bottle - I'm all about the branding and the environment of course!

This was my desk at work. Check out my QM water bottle – I’m all about the branding and the environment of course!

The process of getting this internship was enlightening in itself. I had to write an application outlining why I was suitable for this role and then I had to attend a Graduate-style interview, which was very beneficial because now I know what to expect after I leave university.

This internship was eye-opening because I got to learn about a sector I hadn’t considered working in before, and now this will go on my list as one of my potential career pathways. On top of that, this term, I am doing QInsight, which is a programme designed to provide students with a better understanding of the civil service. I’ll let you know how it goes, and if you are interested in finding out more about career opportunities at QM, follow the link below:

QM Careers and Enterprise: http://careers.qmul.ac.uk/

Stepping Out of First Year

img_6451Exams are finally done and there goes my first year! It is crazy to think that being in a three-year course would eat up a lot of time but now I’m done with one-third of the way as we speak. In the grand scheme, life passes by in the blink of an eye. I would honestly say this year has been one of the greatest years in my life. It started from coming here alone without anyone that I know, a shy Indonesian kid that tried to make his very first friend. I went through thick and thin with my closest friends that eventually found me, and helped me with the struggles that I face, may it be my studies or even my relationship problems! I’ve got to learn that there are good people out there that become your good friends and that you can depend on them regardless of many circumstances.

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img_7252I even joined clubs here that promoted my physical well-being, simultaneously allowing me to experience further university life and what it feels to be like to be in an international environment. I managed to even experience working part-time in a foreign country, and performed several gigs around London with my band. However, we should all keep in mind that this would not be able to be achieved if all we do is stay in our comfort zone. Reach out of your comfort zone – be tired, be ambitious, be stressed, and in the long-run, you will realise that you have become a stronger version of yourself, and that everything done was worth it. Now that my first year is over, I can’t wait to see what lies ahead in my second year!

One Angry Nan and 76 Minutes I’ll Never Get Back

On the 19th of May, at exactly 12:00 my final exam was over, marking the end of the academic year.  As much as I am looking forward to summer and being a relatively stress-free human for a few months; I am feeling particularly reflective. As well as experiencing all the typical student scenarios; coffee induced late nights in the library, intoxicated Wednesday evenings at the student’s union and subsequently rocking up to your Thursday 9am lecture half still in your pyjamas at 9:10; the most rewarding and exciting moments of the year, are a collation of completely unexpected, spontaneous and terrifying scenarios.  Here are a few of my favourite:

The Time my Grandmother Came to London and Got Very Mad at Theresa May
I had an unexpected phone call off my mum one Wednesday morning, explaining that my Nan and her two friends would be travelling to London to take part in a protest.  I was instructed to go and ensure that she “didn’t get herself into any trouble.”  Assuming this was a slight exaggeration on my mum’s behalf, I arrived at Parliament Square with intentions of a relatively calm afternoon with my Nan.  However, when I emerged from Westminster Tube Station, all I could see was thousands of women draped in purple sashes labelled “WASPI”, yelling, singing and waving their fists towards the Houses of Parliament.  A few hours later I found myself in the heart of that crowd, with my Nan, learning about their struggle and chanting along with them.  After living in London for two years, my first genuine experience at a protest was completely accidental but a completely irreplaceable adventure.

The Time I Got Lost at 4am
We were somewhere in central London, it was 4am, I was exhausted, my friend had just lost her Oyster card, our phones were on low battery, and we weren’t entirely sure of where to get our next bus from.  We decided to walk down the road towards the street map, and stopped to check the name of the street we were on.  Tired, lost and so very ready to be at home in bed, we both looked up at the street name.  Turn Again Lane.  London was surely mocking us.  We looked at each other, both perplexed but desperate enough to be willing to take advice from a street sign, without any exchange of words, we turned around and began walking in the opposite direction.  As if it were a miracle, within 30 seconds we could see our bus stop and within a few minutes we were on our bus, driving through the city centre.  It became clear that being lost in central London isn’t actually something to be hugely concerned about; I mean, I wouldn’t suggest looking to inanimate objects for advice; however, the number of maps, night busses, and people in the similar situations as you almost ensure that there is a way for you to arrive home safely.

The Time I spent 76 Minutes Stuck in a Lift
Living on the 5th floor meant that, occasionally, I had to overcome my slightly irrational fear of lifts.  One morning I was supposed to be travelling to South Wales for a family party and I was running extremely late.  I hopped into the lift with my shoes still untied and clothes falling out of my not very well packed bag.  I was so preoccupied with composing myself that I failed to recognise that the lift was not moving.  It wasn’t until the lights turned off that it dawned on me; I was stuck.  None of the buttons were working.  Everyone I phoned was busy.  After being stuck for 15 minutes, I had to call the fire brigade.  They arrived swiftly but were at a loss when considering possible ways to get me out.  When it got to the half hour mark, I had stressed, cried, gotten frustrated with myself for being lazy and not taking the stairs, called my mum, and finally, accepted the fact that I was probably going to spend the majority of my day completely alone in a glorified box.   One of the firemen stayed outside the lift the entire time, and we discussed a variety of topics from my increasing levels of hunger to the British weather; until finally, after 76 minutes, I was released.

From my first experience calling 999 to accidentally protesting the rising age of pensions with my 60-year-old grandmother, this year has been a series of peculiar events; but I honestly don’t think I would change a thing.  Soon I’ll begin organising my Summer; even though knowing my luck, none of it will go to plan.  I look forward to the slightly terrifying, unsuspected chaos that will almost definitely unfold over the next few months.

 

 

 

 

Good Grades, Social Life, Enough Sleep – How About All Of Them?

Exam time is here! That means a few things:

cramming, cramming, and cramming…and loads of coffee perhaps.

Is cramming necessary though? It is natural for university students like many of us to

stress everything into last minute but                                   of course, that is not wise at all. We all

talk about setting a neat time table and                              creating to-do lists but in the end do not

follow  them  at  all.  Then, how do we                                 prepare  well  for exams,  while getting

enough time to rest and relax? People                                 usually believe that you can only choose

two  out of  these  three:  good grades,                               sleep, and social life. Lucky enough, we

 can     do  the   simple   maths    here.                                 24 hours  for  three   aspects  of life we

        would like to indulge  in. That                                   sounds like 24/3 and that gives us 8.

Eight  hours  of sleep,  eight                                   hours of  studying, and eight

hours of relaxing. Eight hours of relaxing and eight hours of studying is a LOT

of time when you  come to  think  of  it. This simple  8-hour rule  for these

three aspects vital to the lives of university students who wish to obtain a first

in their degrees, get enough sleep for daily energy, and parrrrr-tay! Now, following

the   eight-hour   rule   isn’t  too                                      difficult. That just  means you only

need  a  little  bit of  discipline and                                    not following the timetable wouldn’t

be  much of an issue. What  comes                                     with this eight-hour rule is efficiency

with  this  time.  Be productive  and                                      be efficient – study hard, play hard, and

eventually this while exhaust you to                                     a  good  level where you can get into  a

deep  sleep.  Studying  for 2  hours                                     can  give  you so  much when  you are

focused,  imagine what 8  hours                                       can give you! Relaxing for the same

amount of time can bring you                                     so much  enjoyment  as well. Is

  this  rule difficult?  Definitely not, and it’s definitely worth a try.  Now,  to keep

 track of any  other things, you  can simply make notes on your phone

   and make sure you would not forget any other things, may

    that be giving your parents back home a phone call,

meeting a friend for brunch, and more.

I recommend you all to give this a try this – and hopefully the results would amaze you!

Women and Space

“Science” is the term encompassing the study of our natural and physical world; its structures and behaviours.  A “scientist” is an intellectual with expert knowledge of a particular branch of science.  From the intense study of the human body we gain knowledge of disease and are then able to construct medicines.  By observing the nature of the stars in the sky we are able to assemble a broader perception of the universe in which we live.   Science is the foundation of our society; the knowledge, health, sources of entertainment and standard of living we have today has been built upon centuries of scientific study and discovery.  It is for this reason, I find it incredibly perplexing that science and scientists have not been immune to discrimination.   

In school, we discuss Newton, Einstein and Pythagoras.  At university, I have considered Fermat, Euler and Euclid.  With this education, it wouldn’t be outrageous to believe that female scientists accomplished very little.  However, this is definitely not the case.  The list of influential women within science is, actually, a rather extensive one; but I would like to focus on one in particular. 

Katherine Johnson, an African American physicist and mathematician, made substantial contributions to the US’ aeronautics and space programmes at NASA in the 1950s and 60s.  From a young age, Katherine was a gifted mathematician with a passion to succeed.  Her early career consisted of teaching jobs; as work within mathematics for an African American woman were few and far between.  In 1953, Katherine was offered a job at the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory, which she accepted and so started her career within the early NASA team. 

For five years, Katherine worked in an office labelled “Coloured Computers”.   The women who worked within that office were required to do all of their daily activities completely segregated from the white men.  Regardless of how important their work was, these women were unable to put their names on reports they had contributed to.  Katherine herself said that women needed to be “assertive and aggressive” in order to be recognised; which, she was.

When NASA disbanded the “computing pool” in 1958, Katherine worked as an Aerospace Technologist until her retirement.  A women, who was once unable to use the same bathroom as her scientist colleagues, was now a vital part of an important team.  She calculated the trajectory for the first American man in space, she calculated the launch window for the 1961 Mercury Mission, she plotted back up navigational charts and was asked personally to verify the numbers for John Glen’s orbit around the Earth.  Katherine helped calculate trajectories for the 1969 Apollo mission; as well as helping to establish confidence in new technologies with her work with digital computers.

Katherine Johnson is just one example of many under-appreciated women working in NASA at the time; and is just one of thousands of under-appreciated women contributors to science.  Despite increasing rates of women studying mathematics and science at universities; the percentage of women within STEM careers is still extremely low.  It is vital to celebrate and learn about women who were not only major contributors to science; but had to overcome all kinds of social barriers to do so.  

©2018 QMUL Student Blogs