Huseyin Cizer

Huseyin Cizer
Year 3, MEng Medical Engineering with Industrial Experience
Hi everyone, I'm Huseyin a current Third Year Medical Engineering student who wants to do a year in industry as a part of my course. One of the main things I love doing is helping people in as many ways you could think of, and I hope you can gain some value in your life through my blogs.

How I secured my year-long internship

What will my internship be about?

As I excitedly wait for my exam results, I thought this would be a great opportunity to tell you all about the year-long industrial placement I managed to secure starting from this summer. One of my current main interests is to do with the industry of digital health. This industry encompasses many different sectors which includes wearable devices connected to mobile apps, digitized patient health records, virtual reality and many more! Imagine being able to have a device which measures your heart rate while being connected to your mobile phone. This is an example of one thing I could be expected to do during my internship.

Image 1: Example of a wearable heart rate monitor and mobile app device by a company called Under Armour

Image 1: An example of a wearable device and mobile app to measure heart rate by a company called Under Armour (this is not the exact same wearable device I will be using during my internship).

What did I do to secure my internship?

Securing my internship involved being very proactive – this is a must have characteristic for everyone! Through sending speculative emails for internship opportunities, I was accepted by the company based on my skills set and previous experience on my CV. I was then asked to attend an interview which I did and was able to complete successfully. This brings me to my next point which is to always be prepared. Without previous preparation of tailoring my CV to the companies I was applying to, as well as anticipating possible interview questions I may be asked, I may not have been able to secure this internship in the first place. QMUL was very helpful during the process of my preparations, where in particular, the departmental specific industrial manager for my course helped improve my CV, as well as gave me advice on how to prepare for interviews. For example, one useful tip for tailoring a CV I used was checking the company website for current roles and reading job descriptions. In this way, I was able to ensure the skills and experience I outlined on my CV were aligned with what the company was looking for. In regards to interviews, one main tip was to understand the power of pausing for thought when asked a question during an interview – I used to think pausing to think about how to answer a question was a bad thing as it may show a lack of knowledge to the interviewer.

Final thoughts!
I cannot wait for my internship to begin this summer, where I will finally get to apply the current knowledge I have gained during my studies. In addition, the fact that I will be helping to improve the lives of people through the work I will be carrying out during my internship makes it even more motivating!

Revision and Relaxing

When the revision period starts, this is an opportunity for me to test my knowledge on everything I have learnt, and identify any gaps in my current understanding. In the past I may have dreaded the revision period due to the natural stresses that exams can cause, but now I am more relaxed which mainly comes down to giving myself regular breaks when revising and rewarding myself daily for hard work. A typical revision day for me involves treating my day as if I am going to university. I start revising around 9am until 6pm, taking regular breaks when needed. I first start with the most difficult module, as I feel mentally fresh at the start of the day, and continue with other modules later. In general, I find studying 2 modules a day to be optimum for myself although other people may find this to be different.

Image 1: This is an example of a study area at QMUL which gives a more relaxed environment for studying.

Image 1: This is an example of one of many study areas at QMUL which I use to study.

Once I have finished revising for the day, I always make sure to reward myself. Psychologically, this makes me feel much better about revising because I always know I will have time for myself if I work hard. Therefore, I am more likely to be focused entirely on revision when studying, and completely switch off from studying mode when having fun. Another reason why I always reward myself is that this gives my mind a chance to relax. I like to think of my mind as a funnel which I fill with information, but there is only so much information I can absorb and process. In this case, feeling overwhelmed would be equivalent to the funnel overflowing, while having time to relax would be the funnel emptying so that next time I am ready to absorb new information. If I could share my top 3 tips when it comes to revising I would say the following:
1) Always try to make your study notes easily accessible
2) Always try to keep your study area tidy – Think “Clear desk, clear mind”
3) As long as you tried your best there is nothing more you can do when it comes to revising.

Image 1: Don't forget to relax as well !

Image 2: Don’t forget to relax!

Revision is meant to challenge you and ensure you are well prepared for an exam. It is also completely normal to feel stressed at times.  Why not try rewarding yourself more next time? You may even be surprised to find you actually study better and more efficiently as well. Evidence has actually shown that having time for yourself especially when revising, could increase your ability to retain information!

Fixing bones and finding new solutions

Last week I submitted a group project report for a module called “Implants Design”. This module includes designing implants for the human body and understanding the way broken bones heal. During the project we had to design a new bone fracture implant device. We were given a case study of an elderly patient who had broken their leg bone and was suffering a number of medicals conditions. Below you can see a CT scan (a special type of imaging technique) of the broken bones of the patient (image 1).

Image 1: CT scan of the patient with a broken leg.

Image 1: CT scan of the patient with a broken leg. The lettering identifies where the bone fractures were found.

Once we identified the issues with the patient, we researched the current ways bone fractures are fixed. We found many ways such as a cage like contraption called the ilizarov frame (image 2), which holds bone together using wires and a metal frame.

Image 2: An example of the ilizarov fracture fixation device currently used in industry.

Image 2: An example of the ilizarov fracture fixation device currently used in industry.

After countless meetings and sessions generating ideas, which included drawing sketches and models (Image 3 and 4), the group came up with a final design for solving the bone fracture (Image 5). The design was produced using special software known as Computer Aided Design (CAD) to create a computer model of the implant. The final design was also discussed in a final report which included describing how the implant works and how surgeons could implant the device during surgery.

Image 3: An example of an initial sketch of an implant, produced during an idea generation meeting.

Image 3: An example of an initial sketch of an implant, produced during an idea generation meeting.

Image 4: An initial CAD design for a possible implant.

Image 4: An initial CAD design for a possible implant.

 

 

 

Image 5: A side view of the final CAD design of the implant.

Image 5: A side view of the final CAD design of the implant.

This was a very enjoyable coursework overall and is definitely one of my favourite group projects to date. Perhaps one day I could make my implant design a reality!

Third year project update – The results are in !

From my last post on my third year project, you will be aware that I am currently working on nanofibres for their use in protective respirators. I can now confidently say that I have finished all my experiments. One aspect of my experiments involved making the nanofibres using a machine (which spins really fast) called Jet Spinning. Below you can see an image of what the nanofibres look like once they have been made – they look a bit like candy floss!

Image 2 - Collecting nanofibres from the Jet Spinning machine.

Image 1 – Collecting nanofibres from the Jet Spinning machine.

 

Image 3 - Nanofibres after they have been made !

Image 2 – Nanofibres after they have been made !

The other part of my experiment was to test how well the filters made from nanofibres, protected against air contaminants such as dust. I then managed to look at these filters under a microscope where dust particles were captured in the filter:

Image 4 - Dust particle captured in the nanofibres

Image 4 – Dust particle captured in the nanofibres.

 

Image 5 - A close up view of a captured dust particle.

Image 5 – A close up view of a captured dust particle.

Now that I have finished my experiments, the next thing I need to do is write a report talking about my third year project, as well as my key findings from my experiments. After that, I will then have an oral examination where I have to formally answer questions about my project to examiners. The journey so far has been such a great learning experience and is definitely one I will cherish for years to come!

What do rocks, pebbles an empty jar and sand have in common with prioritising?

Many of us, especially students, are faced with multiple tasks that need to be completed every day. So how do I make sure I get all the important stuff done while still having time to carry out my hobbies? Let’s solve this problem, using an analogy you might have heard of.

Below you can see a list of things I need to complete, as well as what I would like to do for the day:

Important tasks (rocks):
1. Attend lectures
2. Write lecture notes on tissue mechanics.
3. Email lecturer about problem with answering exam question.
4. Write blog for Widening Participation student ambassador work.

Less important tasks (pebbles):
1. Top up my bus card.
2. Renew my borrowed library book.

Leisure/Fun (sand):
1. Watch my favourite TV show.
2. Go out with friends.

The challenge is how to fit all these items (rocks, pebbles and sand) in one jar. The jar represents the amount of time you have in a day.

Image 1: Rocks, pebbles, sand and empty jar to start off the day with.

Image 1: Rocks, pebbles, sand and empty jar to start off the day with.

 

Image 2: Trying to complete the least important tasks and hobbies first, mean I cannot complete all the important tasks (Rocks) in a day (Jar).

Image 2: Putting off the important tasks means I cannot complete them all in a day.

 

 

Image 3: If I complete all the important tasks first, followed by the less important ones and hobbies, I can fit everything I need to do into one day.

Image 3: If I complete all the important tasks first, followed by the less important ones and hobbies, I can fit everything I need to do into one day.

Remember that this rock, jar, pebble and sand analogy is not the only way to organise completing your tasks, and should be considered as a “tool” if required. I have used this technique throughout my time at university, and have had a lot of success with it. It is definitely worth giving it a go if you haven’t tried it out already!

My current third year project at university

As a third year student, one of the things I am expected to do is an individual third year project. My project is currently based on the study of nanofibres (really small fibres which are similar to fibres in your clothing) for their use in respiratory protective equipment (A device which protects against dangerous particles in the air such as dust). This week for example, I had to complete a presentation on my current findings for to my supervisor (see next paragraph for what a supervisor does). This involved summarising the key research I found from scientific papers published by other scientists such as how big the nanofibres are and where respirators are used in the real world.

Image 1: This is an example of a respirator worn around the face.

Image 1: This is an example of a respirator worn around the face.

Image 2: This is one component for the respirator which a filter is attached to and is then worn by an individual.

Image 2: This is one component for the respirator which is a filter attached and worn by an individual.

Image 3: The actual filter I am planning to replicate using nanofibres.

Image 3: The actual filter I am planning to replicate using nanofibres.

Image 4: Filter holder to hold the filter from image 3 which is then attached to the respirator in image 2.

Image 4: Filter holder to hold the filter from image 3 which is then attached to the respirator in image 2.

Furthermore, third year students are also assigned a project supervisor who guides them on things such as decision making, based on their experience, in the area that the student is researching. In my case, I not only work alongside my supervisor, but I also work with their PhD research student. For the upcoming months I will be carrying out experiments designed by myself, to test filters used in respiratory equipment. Below you can see an image I took of these fibres using specialist microscopic equipment. These fibres will be used to make the filter which is used in respirators.

Image 5: What the filter from image 3 looks like when taken apart.

Image 5: What the filter from image 3 looks like when taken apart.

 

Image 6: What the fibres look like under a special microscope.

Image 6: What the fibres look like under a special microscope.

What is even more exciting is that if my work is successfully carried out, I could potentially publish my work for other scientists to see, who could use my project to help with their own research !

How I use QMplus to enhance my learning

QMplus is an e-learning resource that is used by students at QMUL. The QMplus website allows students to book study rooms, renew borrowed library books, and access online books. Today I will be focusing on using QMplus for accessing course information for my modules.

Lets take my module called “Tissue Engineering and Regenerative Medicine” and look at the module page on QMplus. Looking at image 1 below, you can see QMplus allows me to see all course content uploaded by my lecturers for this module. For example, I am able to access all my timetable information under the “Timetable” tab, lecture notes under the “Lecture notes” tab, coursework information under the “Coursework” tab and so on. Lecture notes usually tend to be in either PDF, Word Document or Powerpoint format depending on the lecturers choice. In addition, lecturers tend to upload lab handouts prior to a session in the lab, so students have an idea of what it will involve. Also to note, if my lecturer recommends a class textbook, the book details are also uploaded as you can see from image 2. Finally, another amazing feature of QMplus is the “Module Forum” (See image 4). This is a module specific forum which gives a quick way of asking any questions you may have, which can be answered by both students and lecturers on the same course. This is especially useful because I often find answers to questions I haven’t thought about before.

Image 1: Example layout of QMplus for my module page.

Image 1: Example layout of QMplus for my module page.

 

Image 2: Accessing lab handouts from the QMplus page .

Image 2: Accessing lab handouts from the QMplus page.

 

Image 3: Example recommended reading for tissue engineering module BUT, it is not compulsory to read all the books.

Image 3: Example recommended reading list for the tissue engineering module BUT, it is not compulsory to read all the books for this particular module.

 

Image 4: An example forum question I asked for another moduke (With a response from lecturer).

Image 4: An example forum question I asked for another module (With a response from lecturer).

In summary, QMplus is integral to my learning for each module, and without it, it would certainly make the learning process much more difficult. Technology has certainly changed the face of learning today!

Is reading a thing only girls do?

You may think of reading as something you do intuitively, but for some people, it is not a skill that comes naturally. Many males in particular are known to be unmotivated when it comes to reading according to news outlets such as the Guardian and BBC, and subsequently have poorer reading skills compared to females.
I am currently taking part on a new Widening Participation programme here at QMUL, called “Boys, Books and Blogging”, where I will be working with year 10 male students to read and discuss two books that have been selected for them. Below you can see the title of the two books I am currently discussing with the students:

tuesdays-with-morrie

Book 1: Tuesdays with Morrie by Mitch Albom

 

Book 2: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time

Book 2: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time

The sessions with the students will last 7 weeks, where I aim to encourage the boys to become more interested in reading and read more in general. The boys will also be discussing their approaches, attitudes and time management in regards to reading, and will write blog entries about their experience on the programme. They will also be going to see “The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time” at the theatre in December. These blogs will be published on the Widening Participation QMUL website. Here are some pictures that were taken this week:

Quiet reading time with some of the year 10 students

Image 1: Quiet reading time with some of the year 10 students.

 

Image 2: Great to see the boys engaging in the blog writing!

Student summarizing his thoughts so far on the book he selected.

Image 3: Student summarizing his thoughts so far on the book he’s reading. Brilliant !

Another student writing up his blog

Image 4: Another student writing up his blog !

Being part of this programme reminds me of when I was in year 10, where I also was not fond of reading. I discovered that reading what interests me most (whether that be football, robots, food and other topics), is much better than not reading at all. If you look at me now, I can’t get enough of reading and always find time to read especially on the bus journey to university. Anything is possible if you put your mind to it. Reading is a powerful tool, and one in which everyone must have a great grasp of in order to reach their full potential in life. Without reading, you are bound to come across problems as simple as reading a job application for a job you want. Don’t let that person be you!

What are university timetables like for students?

As I begin to settle into my third year, as with the previous years, my weekly timetable begins to take shape. During the first week of term, I was provided with a timetable which includes when and where my lectures will be taking place. This timetable will be used throughout both semesters of my degree course – a semester is part of an “academic term period” which here at QMUL consists of 12 weeks of classes. In addition, QMUL categorize their semesters as “Semester 1”, “Semester 2” and “Semester 3”. Below I have given an example of what my timetable looks like for semester 1, and information on how to read timetables in general.

personal timetable

Image 1: My personal timetable for the subjects I study. (Note: Click on image for clearer view)

 

How to read timetable 1

Image 2: These are the official QMUL guidelines for how to read your timetable. (Note: Click on image for clearer view)

As you can see, my timetable includes a mixture of IT labs (labs based on specialist computer software) and lectures. I don’t have any seminars for my course, but for many students, this would typically involve getting into groups with your class mates, and discussing in detail, questions set by the lecturer about what was mentioned during lectures. It is also worth noting that in week 7 of each semester, there is a period known as reading week. This is where there is no teaching and it gives students the chance to catch up with their understanding of the course material so far. Finally from image 1, the blank spaces on the timetable indicates free time. Here it is expected students use this time for independent study around the course material.

Next semester I will be getting a new timetable which will have different modules from my first semester. If you want to check out the current general calendar for students at QMUL check out this link. It is also worth being aware that each student’s timetable will be different depending on the course they are studying. They will therefore have lectures at different times, as well as days where they have no lectures.

 

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