Studying in Greece

Elliot Hamlin

LLM International Shipping Law


Having lived and studied all my life within the UK, I became accustomed to all types of rain based weather (drizzle, spitting, sleet, hail, mist, even a damp haze). I saw the opportunity to study in Piraeus, Athens as the chance to break a habit of a lifetime and not indulge in the daily English chat of how bleak is the weather. I moved to Piraeus in September of last year and spent two weeks getting to know the city. The city has much to offer and its large marina is home to some of the most magnificent private yachts in the Mediterranean. The public are free to walk along and it’s a great place to grab a coffee and enjoy the warm evenings. One issue to watch out for when moving to Greece as a foreigner is the issue of opening a bank account. Due to the capital control regulations placed on banks the banks have become reluctant to open new bank accounts. From personal experience, I would recommend Piraeus Bank as the easiest and involving the least paperwork.

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The course is situated at the Hellenic Management Centre which is very central and just off the main high-street. The centre has good facilities with a good-sized library and very friendly staff. It is where all the lectures and exams take place. The centre also organises several extra-curricular events throughout the year and organises a 5-aside football team. I was lucky enough to play for the 5-aside team which gave me the opportunity to get to know the other students studying at the centre. They were a very friendly bunch and were eager to ensure that my Greek improved, especially the words for penalty and foul.

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Piraeus is the fourth largest city in Greece, but due to its proximity to Athens it has the feel of a much larger city (it takes about 30 minutes to get from Piraeus to Athens using the Metro). This proximity also allows students the freedom to live and study in either Piraeus or Athens. Airbnb is a great website for this and there are hundreds of good value properties on the market. I chose to move to the neighbourhood of Ambelokipi which is about 15-minute walk from central Athens. The neighbourhood was fascinating and is fairly typical of most of Athens. The majority of the shops are locally owned and this means that they cater for eclectic tastes. For example, on my road there was an antiques shop, old book shop, two shops catering for toy models and a record shop. Another great thing about shopping in Athens is the local markets. Throughout the year there are daily markets offering really good value fruit and veg much fresher than that sold in the Supermarkets.

Greece, Athens, and Piraeus have a lot to offer and am pleased I took the opportunity to enjoy the Mediterranean pace of life.

 

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